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Gambling Addiction ↓

Gambling can be defined as betting something of value when the outcome is uncertain. Gambling occurs in many forms, most commonly are: lotteries, casinos (slot machines, table games), bookmaking (sports books and horse books), card rooms, bingo, and pari-mutuels (horse and dog tracks, off-track-betting, Jai Alai). Pathological or Compulsive Gambling is identified as an impulse control disorder and has features similar to other addictive disorders, without involving the use of an intoxicating drug. What are the warning signs of pathological gambling? Gamblers' Anonymous asks its new members twenty questions: Did you ever lose time from work due to gambling? Has gambling ever made your home life unhappy? Did gambling affect your reputation? Have you ever felt remorse after gambling? Did you ever gamble to get money in which to pay debts or otherwise solve financial difficulties? Did gambling cause a decrease in your ambition or efficiency? After losing, did you feel you must return as soon as possible to win back your losses? After a win, did you have a strong urge to return and win more? Did you often gamble until your last dollar was gone? Did you ever borrow to finance your gambling? Have you ever sold anything to finance your gambling? Were you reluctant to use "gambling money" for normal expenditures? Did gambling make you careless of the welfare of yourself and your family? Did you ever gamble longer than you planned? Have you ever gambled to escape worry our trouble? Have you ever committed or considered committing an illegal act to finance gambling? Did gambling cause you to have difficulty in sleeping? Do arguments, disappointments, or frustrations create within you an urge to gamble? Did you ever have an urge to celebrate any good fortune by a few hours of gambling? Have you ever considered self-destruction as a result of your gambling? Pathological gamblers usually answer yes to at least 7 of these questions.

Video-Game Addiction ↓

Video game addiction is described as an impulse control disorder, which does not involve use of an intoxicating drug and is very similar to pathological gambling. Video game addiction has also been referred to as video game overuse, pathological or compulsive/excessive use of computer games and/or video games. Statistics show that men and boys are more likely to become addicted to video games versus women and girls. Recent research has found that nearly one in 10 youth gamers (ages 8-18) can be classified as pathological gamers or addicted to video-gaming.